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#ask-ai
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# ask-ai
s

Selim Raboudi

02/23/2024, 5:07 PM
@Scout I want to define in one place all my airbyte assets that I will be reusing across different pipelines. I thought of building a custom python package, common/ to include those assets, then load the assets in other pipelines by importing the common package. Is this a bad idea ?
s

Scout

02/23/2024, 5:07 PM
We encourage reusability and modularity in your Dagster projects, and defining your Airbyte assets in a common location to be reused across different pipelines is a good practice. This approach aligns with the principles of software engineering where code reuse can lead to more maintainable and scalable systems. Creating a custom Python package, such as
common/
, to include those assets can be an effective way to organize your code. You can then import and load the assets in other pipelines by referencing this common package. This is similar to how you might handle any other shared Python code. The documentation provides examples of how to define and load Airbyte assets using the
dagster_airbyte
module. For instance, you can define Airbyte assets using the
build_airbyte_assets
function and then load them into your Dagster definitions:
Copy code
python
from dagster_airbyte import build_airbyte_assets, AirbyteCloudResource
from dagster import Definitions, EnvVar

airbyte_instance = AirbyteCloudResource(
    api_key=EnvVar("AIRBYTE_API_KEY"),
)
airbyte_assets = build_airbyte_assets(
    connection_id="your_connection_id",
    destination_tables=["your_destination_tables"],
)

defs = Definitions(assets=[airbyte_assets], resources={"airbyte": airbyte_instance})
You can place such code within your
common/
package and then import
defs
in other pipelines to use the defined Airbyte assets. Additionally, you can use utilities like
load_assets_from_package_module()
to load all assets defined within a Python package, which can further simplify the process of reusing assets across different pipelines. Remember to manage dependencies carefully and ensure that the common package is accessible in the environments where your pipelines run. This might involve setting up proper Python paths, using virtual environments, or installing the package in your deployment environment. In summary, your idea of building a custom Python package to include and reuse Airbyte assets across different pipelines is a sound approach and is supported by the patterns and utilities provided by Dagster. Using Dagster with Airbyte Cloud button Add upstream option to load_assets_from_... button Dagster Docs button Understanding use of assets across code ... button Thank you for your feedback!
s

Selim Raboudi

02/23/2024, 5:10 PM
@Scout here is my folder structure: dagster_cloud.yaml setup.py dagster/ common/ pipelines/ pipeline_1/ pipeline_2/ How do I ensure the common package is added as a dependency of the pipeline_1 package ? Give me the syntax of the setup.py file
s

Scout

02/23/2024, 5:10 PM
To ensure that the
common
package is added as a dependency of the
pipeline_1
package, you will need to structure your
setup.py
file to include both packages and define the dependency relationship. Here's an example of how you might structure your
setup.py
file:
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python from setuptools import setup, find_packages  setup(     name='dagster_project',     version='0.1.0',     description='A Dagster project with common assets and pipelines',     author='Your Name',     author_email='<mailto:your.email@example.com|your.email@example.com>',     packages=find_packages(),     install_requires=[         # List your project's dependencies here.         # If `common` has external dependencies, list them here as well.     ],     # If `common` is used by `pipeline_1` internally and not installed separately,     # you don't need to specify it in `install_requires`. Just ensure it's discoverable     # as part of your project's packages. )
In this
setup.py
file,
find_packages()
will automatically discover all packages in your project, including
common
and
pipeline_1
. Since
common
is part of the same project and not an external dependency, you don't need to list it in
install_requires
. The
install_requires
section is typically used for external dependencies that need to be installed from PyPI or another package index. If
common
is a namespace package that is shared across multiple projects and you want to install it separately, you would need to create a separate
setup.py
for
common
and then install it as an external dependency for
pipeline_1
. However, based on your folder structure, it seems that
common
is intended to be an internal package within the same project. Make sure that your Python environment is set up correctly and that you install your
dagster_project
package in this environment. If you're using a virtual environment, you can install the package in editable mode with
pip install -e .
from the root directory where
setup.py
is located. This will allow you to import
common
from within
pipeline_1
or any other part of your project.
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