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#ask-ai
Title
# ask-ai
a

Axel Mendoza

03/06/2024, 8:59 AM
@Scout How to dagster dev in local if I have a configuration that uses internal IPs from a VPC? Here's my dagster dev:
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storage:
  mysql:
    mysql_db:
      username:
        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_USERNAME
      password:
        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_PASSWORD
      hostname:
        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_HOSTNAME
      db_name:
        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_DB
      port: 3306

compute_logs:
  module: dagster_gcp.gcs.compute_log_manager
  class: GCSComputeLogManager
  config:
    bucket:
      env: DAGSTER_GCS_BUCKET_NAME
    prefix: "dagster-compute-logs"
    upload_interval: 30

run_launcher:
  module: dagster.core.launcher
  class: DefaultRunLauncher

run_coordinator:
  module: dagster.core.run_coordinator
  class: QueuedRunCoordinator

telemetry:
  enabled: false
The issue is that I cannot connect to the mysql db as my local machine is not on the VPC and a tunnel is not an option. What do you advise?
s

Scout

03/06/2024, 8:59 AM
To develop locally with Dagster while using a configuration that relies on internal IPs from a VPC, you'll need to find a way to connect to the resources within the VPC from your local machine. Since you've mentioned that a tunnel is not an option, here are some alternative approaches you could consider: 1. Local Database for Development: Instead of connecting to the MySQL database in the VPC, you could run a local instance of MySQL for development purposes. You would adjust your
dagster.yaml
to point to the local database credentials and host. This way, you can develop and test locally without needing access to the VPC. 2. Mocking or Stubbing: For services that you cannot access locally, such as GCS for compute logs, you could mock or stub out these services in your local development environment. This would allow you to bypass the actual service calls during development. 3. Cloud SQL Proxy: If you're using Google Cloud SQL, you could use the [Cloud SQL Proxy](https://cloud.google.com/sql/docs/mysql/sql-proxy) to connect to your Cloud SQL instance securely from your local machine. This proxy provides secure access to your Cloud SQL instance without the need for a VPN or whitelisting IPs. 4. Port Forwarding with a Bastion Host: If you have a bastion host (also known as a jump host) set up in your VPC, you could use SSH port forwarding to forward a port on your local machine to the MySQL port on the VPC. This would allow you to connect to the database as if it were running locally. 5. Use a VPN: If your organization provides a VPN that can connect to the VPC, you could use it to access the internal resources from your local machine. 6. Replicate Data to a Local Database: If the data size is manageable, you could replicate the necessary data from the VPC database to a local MySQL instance. This would allow you to work with real data without needing to maintain a constant connection to the VPC. 7. Hybrid Approach: Use a combination of the above methods. For example, you could use a local database for most development and only connect to the VPC-hosted database for specific integration testing. Remember to keep security best practices in mind when choosing an approach, especially if you're handling sensitive data. It's also important to ensure that your local development environment is as close as possible to the production environment to avoid issues when deploying your code. Please note that these suggestions are general development practices and not specific to Dagster. You should choose the approach that best fits your development workflow and organizational policies.
a

Axel Mendoza

03/06/2024, 9:01 AM
@Scout Would it be possible to create another
dagster-dev.yaml
for dev purposes where I don't connect to the CloudSQL instance? If so how can I specify in the
dagster dev
command the yaml to run?
s

Scout

03/06/2024, 9:01 AM
Yes, it is possible to create a separate
dagster-dev.yaml
configuration file for local development purposes where you don't connect to the CloudSQL instance. You can then specify which instance configuration file to use when running
dagster dev
by setting the
DAGSTER_HOME
environment variable to a directory containing your
dagster-dev.yaml
file. Here's how you can do it: 1. Create a new directory for your local Dagster instance configuration, for example,
~/dagster_dev_instance
. 2. Inside this directory, create your
dagster-dev.yaml
file with the desired configuration for local development. 3. Before running
dagster dev
, set the
DAGSTER_HOME
environment variable to point to the directory containing your
dagster-dev.yaml
. You can do this in your terminal session like so:
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bash export DAGSTER_HOME=~/dagster_dev_instance
4. Now, when you run
dagster dev
, it will use the configuration specified in
~/dagster_dev_instance/dagster-dev.yaml
. Remember to include all necessary configurations in your
dagster-dev.yaml
file, such as storage, compute logs, run launcher, and run coordinator, but with settings appropriate for your local development environment. Please note that the
DAGSTER_HOME
environment variable tells Dagster where to look for the instance configuration file (
dagster.yaml
), and it is not specific to the
dagster dev
command. This means that any Dagster command you run in that terminal session will use the configuration from the specified
DAGSTER_HOME
directory.
a

Axel Mendoza

03/06/2024, 9:09 AM
@Scout I need to run it from the same dir
s

Scout

03/06/2024, 9:09 AM
If you need to run
dagster dev
from the same directory but with a different configuration file, you can use the
dagster.yaml
override feature. This feature allows you to specify an alternative instance configuration file when running Dagster commands. Here's how you can use it: 1. Place your alternative configuration file, such as
dagster-dev.yaml
, in the same directory as your default
dagster.yaml
or in a directory of your choice. 2. When running
dagster dev
, use the
--config
flag to specify the path to your alternative configuration file. For example:
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bash dagster dev --config dagster-dev.yaml
This command tells Dagster to use the
dagster-dev.yaml
file instead of the default
dagster.yaml
for this particular execution. Please note that this approach assumes that the
--config
flag is supported by the
dagster dev
command to specify an alternative configuration file. If this flag is not available in the version of Dagster you are using, you may need to rely on the
DAGSTER_HOME
environment variable approach or consider using a different workflow, such as running a local instance of your services for development purposes.
a

Axel Mendoza

03/06/2024, 9:22 AM
@Scout If I remove these lines:
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#storage:
#  mysql:
#    mysql_db:
#      username:
#        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_USERNAME
#      password:
#        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_PASSWORD
#      hostname:
#        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_HOSTNAME
#      db_name:
#        env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_DB
#      port: 3306
When I will run the docker configuration in production the instance will not connect to the mysql instance or this is specified in the Docker compose configuration?
s

Scout

03/06/2024, 9:22 AM
In a typical Dagster deployment, the
dagster.yaml
file is used to configure the Dagster instance, including specifying how Dagster should connect to external services like databases for storage. If you remove the MySQL storage configuration from your
dagster.yaml
file, Dagster will not have the information it needs to connect to the MySQL instance when you run it in production. However, if you are using Docker Compose for your production deployment, you can specify environment variables in your
docker-compose.yml
file that provide the necessary configuration for connecting to MySQL. These environment variables can be picked up by Dagster if your
dagster.yaml
file is set up to read from environment variables. For example, your
docker-compose.yml
might include a service definition for the Dagster instance like this:
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yaml services:   dagster:     image: my-dagster-image     environment:       DAGSTER_MYSQL_USERNAME: myusername       DAGSTER_MYSQL_PASSWORD: mypassword       DAGSTER_MYSQL_HOSTNAME: mysql       DAGSTER_MYSQL_DB: mydb       DAGSTER_HOME: /path/to/dagster_home     # Other configuration...
And then your
dagster.yaml
file would be configured to read from these environment variables:
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yaml storage:   mysql:     mysql_db:       username:         env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_USERNAME       password:         env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_PASSWORD       hostname:         env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_HOSTNAME       db_name:         env: DAGSTER_MYSQL_DB       port: 3306 # Other configuration...
With this setup, when you run your Docker Compose configuration, the Dagster service will have the necessary environment variables set, and the
dagster.yaml
file will instruct Dagster to use those environment variables to connect to MySQL. If you remove the MySQL configuration from
dagster.yaml
, you will need to ensure that it is provided in some other way when you run Dagster in production. This could be through environment variables directly, or by having a separate
dagster.yaml
file for production that includes the MySQL configuration and is mounted into the Docker container. It's important to manage your configuration files carefully to ensure that the correct settings are used in each environment (development, staging, production, etc.). You might have different
dagster.yaml
files for different environments, or you might use environment variables to override certain settings when running in Docker.
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